Page: E SC E SC

MSV MSV

Running Record Recording Sheet

Reproduced with permission from the Toronto District School Board. © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2003

Assessment: Running Records

Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: _____________________________

Book Title: _________________________________________________ Familiar Text: _______________________

Number of Words: ____________ Level: ________________________ Unfamiliar Text: _____________________

Accuracy/Self-Correction Ratio: __________________________________________________________________________

Cues Used: Strategies Used:

Meaning ________________________________________ Monitoring _______________________________________

Structure ________________________________________ Cross-Checking ____________________________________

Visual ___________________________________________ Searching ________________________________________

Page: E SC E SC

MSV MSV

Running Record Recording Sheet Page____

Reproduced with permission from the Toronto District School Board. © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2003

Assessment: Running Records

Making Instructional Decisions/Teaching for Strategies

1.

What evidence can you find of strategies being used?

(Identify each strategy and give examples from the running record.)

2.

What strategies are needed?

3.

How would you teach the needed strategy?

Reproduced with permission from the Toronto District School Board. © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2003

Assessment: Running Records

How to complete the Running Record Recording Sheet.

Although you can use a blank piece of paper to administer a running record, it is helpful to use a blank

Running Record Recording Sheet to help with organization.

1

. Fill in the basic information on the top of the form. Include the number of running words,

the level of the text and whether the book is seen (familiar) or unseen (unfamiliar).

2

. After administering the running record, use a scrap piece of paper or a calculator to determine

the accuracy and self-correction ratios.Write the ratios on the front of the recording sheet.

A student should self-correct after monitoring, noting a discrepancy, and searching for and

using additional information to correct the problem. Self-correction is noted in the form of a

self-correction ratio.The goal is for the student to self-correct at least 1 error in every 4 errors (1:4).

3.

Under Cues Used summarize the cues or sources of information the student used. Look for

patterns in the MSV analysis of errors and self-corrections.Use a checkmark to indicate that the

source of information was used regularly.

4.

Fill in the Making Instructional Decisions/Teaching for Strategies sheet. Record whether or not the

student used the various sources of information on a regular basis.

Record other observations such as:

• Used MS together

• Neglected V

• Used V at self-correction

• Used sounding at difficulty

• Used all 3 together

5.

Under Strategies Used consider the student’s observed reading behaviours, place a checkmark

beside the strategy or strategies used by the student, then add summary comments to the

Making Instructional Decisions/Teaching for Strategies

sheet.

Monitoring:

Monitoring ensures that the reading makes sense semantically, syntactically

and visually (makes sense, sounds right and looks right). Proficient readers stop and check

the reading only if the three sources of information do not match.Young readers need to

learn how to monitor reading for accuracy.

Assessment: Running Records © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2003

Sample monitoring summary comments:

• Paused at errors (the student knew something was wrong

but did not yet know what to do about it)

• Repeated phrases after error (the student knew something

was wrong and tried to obtain additional information)

• Appealed for confirmation after error

Cross-Checking:

Cross-checking is a subset of monitoring.Many early readers use crosschecking.

The student uses one or two sources of information, then cross-checks the word

by using another (the neglected) source of information. For example: the student reads

ran

instead of walked. The student appears to have used meaning and structure but not

visual information. If the student cross-checks, the attempt is checked using visual information.

The student should note that ran does not visually match walked.

Sample cross-checking comments:

• Used V to check MS

• Used MS to check V

Searching:

Searching is a strategy used by the student to search for (and use) information

to solve a word.The student may use meaning, structure or visual information, or a combination

of the three sources of information.

Sample searching comments:

• Used picture

• Used initial sound

• Covered ending

• Found chunks

• Read on

6.

Write a brief comment on the Making Instructional Decisions/Teaching for Strategies sheet

about required teaching focus based on the information obtained from the running record.

What does the student do well? What needs to be taught next? This teaching focus can

then be incorporated into individual, group or whole class instruction.

Assessment: Running Records © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2003